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Redistricting Update--time to act!
Linda Hanson
Published on: 11/28/2020
All IN 4 Democracy, our coalition for redistricting reform in Indiana, is calling for applications to the Indiana Citizens Redistricting Commission (ICRC). The ICRC will demonstrate how the redistricting process in Indiana should be conducted. It will show that a politically balanced group of citizens working transparently and in cooperation with citizens can devise districts that will serve the public interest, not the interests of politicians.
The ICRC will hold a series of virtual public meetings in January and February of 2021 to take public testimony on what redistricting criteria should guide the map-drawing process....They will also sponsor a map-drawing competition and serve as the judges for that competition.... Reports and maps will be submitted to the IN General Assembly (IGA) and we will lobby for adoption of the maps drawn through a transparent process by a politically balanced group of citizens. More...
Greening of the Statehouse
Linda Hanson
Published on: 11/27/2020
Last weekend the Hoosier Environmental Council hosted the annual Greening of the Statehouse Conference. LWVIN again Co-sponsored the event, and our Natural Resources team had a virtual booth at the conference. Thanks to the team's newest member, Kristina Lindborg, we also had a slide show that provides an overview of our environmental advocacy activities.
LWVUS statement on transition of presidential power
LWVUS
Published on: 11/23/2020
“A peaceful transition of power is essential to our democracy and required to ensure national security continuity between administrations. The current administration’s refusal to ascertain president-elect Joe Biden is disgraceful and puts our entire country at risk."
LWVUS statement on the firing of top cybersecurity expert
LWVUS
Published on: 11/22/2020
The League of Women Voters is deeply concerned at the untimely firing of Chris Krebs, a dedicated public servant, whose leadership and dedication to safeguarding our votes led to successful, free, and fair elections in 2020.
Blog from Dr. Turner on the election of a woman of color to the vice presidency
LWVUS
Published on: 11/21/2020
...this year we have a very special success to celebrate: we have a woman ready to take her rightful place in the White House. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris is prepared to be the first woman to ascend to one of the highest offices in our country. It has been a long time coming, America.
Outlining VOTE411’s reach in 2020
Vote411
Published on: 11/21/2020
The 2020 election cycle saw record voter turnout and for the League of Women Voters Education Fund, our VOTE411.org election information website also broke records! This year more than 6 million users came to VOTE411.org, the League’s one-stop-shop election website.
LWVUS warns for claims for copyright infringement
LWVUS
Published on: 11/14/2020
More and more Leagues are being contacted by third-party firms claiming that Leagues are violating image licenses and must pay so that they will not be sued. The LWVUS offers guidance on what all leagues should do.
Joint Statement - Election Security
Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council
Published on: 11/12/2020
“While we know there are many unfounded claims and opportunities for misinformation about the process of our elections, we can assure you we have the utmost confidence in the security and integrity of our elections, and you should too. When you have questions, turn to elections officials as trusted voices as they administer elections.”
Indiana Suffrage Centennial Newsletter
Indiana Suffrage 100
Published on: 10/9/2020
See information about the Indiana Women's Suffrage Centennial from indianasuffrage100.org
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Linda Hanson
Published on: 9/19/2020
We mourn the passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 87, from complications of the cancer that she fought valiantly for years. Having directed and shaped the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project, she was revered as a women’s rights icon. Her clear-eyed toughness as a litigator and Supreme Court Justice, though, served every person in this country as she fought for equal rights and civil liberties for all.
VOTE411 AND GOTV: Election Updates, Promotion, & Tools
Vote411 and LWVIN Voter Services Committee
Published on: 9/9/2020
View the powerpoint from the 9/9/20 state Workshop about resources for Vote411and Get Out the Vote
US District Court Rules In Favor of LWVIN, NAACP and Brennan Center for Justice
Linda Hanson
Published on: 8/21/2020
It's time to celebrate at least one victory for Indiana voters! The US District Court of the Southern District of Indiana just issued an order – WE WON!
Voter Services Committee issues a Call For Action -NO-EXCUSE ABSENTEE BALLOTS
Voter Services Committee - LWVIN
Published on: 7/14/2020
In this time of COVID-19, LWV members advocate for safe voting. Hoosiers should not be asked to choose between exercising their right to vote and risking their health.
VOTE411.org Wins Webby People’s Voice Award
LWVIN
Published on: 5/19/2020
VOTE411.org Wins Webby People’s Voice Award
2020 Bills that died…
Linda Hanson
Published on: 4/27/2020
ALL DIED, most in committee so that legislators did not have to go on record with a vote that could follow them to the polls. Supermajority control of committees short circuited legislation early in a process that was designed for bi-partisan and public input.

Newsletters

Newsletter - November 19, 2020
LWVIN
Published on: 11/19/2020
View the League of Women Voters of Indiana Newsletter
Newsletter - October 15, 2020
LWVIN
Published on: 10/21/2020
View the October newsletter from the LWVIN
Newsletter - September 17, 2020
LWVIN
Published on: 9/17/2020
View the September newsletter from the LWVIN
Newsletter - August 13, 2020
LWVIN
Published on: 8/13/2020
See the latest newsletter from the LWVIN

Forgotten Foremothers

Anna Murray Douglass
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 10/22/2020
“Well-behaved women seldom make history,” wrote Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, a Pulitzer prize winning historian. The quote quickly transformed from her intended meaning, namely—not that all women should be more rebellious—but that history should concern itself with the actions and thoughts of well-behaved women.
Zitkala-Sa
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 9/17/2020
In 1884, Quaker missionaries visited the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. When they left, they took several children with them to White Indiana Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Ind. Among them was an 8-year-old then called Gertrude Simmons, the daughter of a Sioux Dakota woman and a white man. Her father had left the family years before and she left despite her mother’s objections. She wanted to go to the “Red Apple Country” promised by the missionaries.
Stormé S DeLarverie
Kathryn Gardiner
Published on: 6/28/2020
Profile of a gay rights activist and the confrontation at the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village
Lillian Wald
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 4/20/2020
During the 1918 influenza epidemic, Lillian Wald was a general in charge of an army. As chairperson of the Nurses’ Emergency Council in New York City, she organized supplies and led her fellow nurses and volunteers, all women, in caring for the city’s ailing population.
“Stagecoach Mary” Fields
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 2/14/2020
Mary Fields was born enslaved in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1832, though both the year and the location are best estimates; neither the birthdates nor names of enslaved children were noted in any records. The beginning of Mary’s life would have been marked with only a number upon a property log. Her death was mourned by an entire town.
Aida Overton Walker
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 1/10/2020
Al Jolson’s performance in the 1927 film The Jazz Singer recorded for posterity what had been a popular stage gimmick since the 1800s: white actors with their faces darkened by makeup portraying African-Americans, often as stupid, lazy buffoons. On the rare occasion that theaters did employ black actors, they were relegated to the chorus and background.
It was in this era that Aida Overton Walker became a star, taking to the stage with beauty, poise, talent, and dignity.
Mary Church Terrell
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 1/1/2020
In 1904, suffragettes from around the globe gathered in Berlin, Germany, for the International Congress of Women. Mary Church Terrell was the only black woman in attendance and certainly the only one invited to speak. The audience met her with wild applause as she delivered her address first in German, then in French, and finally in English.
Matilda Joslyn Gage
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 11/25/2019
In 1962, Rosalind Franklin’s uncredited research into the DNA double helix helped earn James Watson and Francis Crick the Nobel Prize. The lack of recognition Franklin received has been attributed to “The Matilda Effect,” which describes the gender bias that often leads to the devaluing or even theft of the achievements of women scientists. Science historian Margaret W. Rossiter coined the term in 1993 and the woman she named it after was Matilda Joslyn Gage.
Victoria Earle Matthews
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 11/1/2019
A woman freed from slavery by the 13th Amendment authored works on the arduous internal struggles of life, including forgiving oppressors, while she actively worked to improve the lives of women of color in the post-war era.
Fannie Lou Hammer
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 9/23/2019
In 1962 – August 31 to be precise – Fannie Lou Hamer, at the age of 45, traveled with other activists to Indianola, Miss., determined to register to vote. Upon arriving, Hamer and the other black women and men were quizzed on the facts of de facto law. “I knowed as much about a facto law as a horse knows about Christmas Day,” Hamer said. When they couldn’t answer the questions, the would-be voters were turned away.
Madam C.J. Walker, Self-made Millionaire
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 8/1/2019
Walker ensured that African-American women were trained in the “Walker System” of hair care and encouraged to become sales agents. Her saleswomen earned a considerable commission and she employed women at all levels of management.
Coralie Franklin Cook
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 5/29/2019
“Rochester has been proud of the citizenship of Frederick Douglass, it has honored Booker T. Washington, and now it is to have an opportunity of responding to a claim on its interest and consideration from a woman of the same race of these men,” declared the Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, New York on Nov. 28, 1902. Coralie Franklin Cook was to speak at the Unitarian Church for their Political Equality Club. She was an active and notable member of the National American Women Suffrage Association, alongside Susan B. Anthony and other leaders of the day.
The Misses Rollin
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 5/1/2019
“If you want a thorough posting upon political affairs in South Carolina, you must call on the Rollins.”
Northern reporters from The Sun and The New York Herald brought all their assumptions into the parlor of the Columbia home of the Rollin sisters of South Carolina.
Rose Pengelly
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 3/25/2019
At age 14, Rose Pengelly led her fellow workers at the Backs Asbestos Pipe Factory in a strike. Her red hair at the head of the procession, she blazed the trail all the way to the Women’s Hall. Conditions at the factory were unacceptable. Men and women were expected to haul equally heavy loads, though women were paid a third of the wage the men received. In addition, women were expected to perform domestic duties for the boss, tasks that were never assigned to the men despite their greater pay.
Daisy Bates
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 2/15/2019
Millie Riley lived a short, brutal life. Only months after giving birth to her daughter in 1914, she was raped, murdered, and her body disposed of in a millpond by three white men. At eight years old, her daughter Daisy Lee Gatson learned what had happened to her mother. She also learned that the men had faced no punishment. At eight years old, she learned that local law enforcement didn’t consider her mother’s murder worth investigating.
Rosa May Billinghurst
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 1/19/2019
“I remember hearing startling stories of her running battles with the police,” said a veteran suffragette of Rosa May Billinghurst. “Her crutches were lodged on each side of her self-propelling invalid chair, and when a meeting was broken up or an arrest being made, she would charge the aggressors at a rate of knots that carried all before her.”
Melvina Walker
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 12/1/2018
“...keep your eyes open,” Melvina Walker said to her fellow poor and working-class women. “...Organize yourselves, don’t be led away by people with ‘superior brains,’ we have something more than that; we have practical experience.”
Nannie Helen Burroughs
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 11/1/2018
“Who’s that young girl?” a man in the audience is quoted as saying. “Why don’t she sit down? She’s always talking. She’s just an upstart.” Burroughs had a ready answer for him. “I might be an upstart, but I am just starting up.”
Celia, 18
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 10/30/2018
In August of 1855, Celia, an enslaved woman of 18, stood before a jury of 12 white men accused of the murder of Robert Newsom. Newsom was a successful Missouri farmer who had purchased Celia four years earlier. Facts not in dispute were that Newsom had sexual relations with Celia frequently since purchasing her at the age of 14 (fathering two children by the teenager) and that Celia had bludgeoned Newsom to death. The question before the jury was whether Celia actions were murder or self- defense.
Rebecca Lee Crumpler
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 9/1/2018
As a little girl in the 1830s, Rebecca sat on the floor of her aunt’s home, watching as the old, the sick, and the suffering came to the door for help. Rebecca was born free to her parents in Delaware, but was raised by her aunt in Pennsylvania, and this aunt was a caregiver, an unofficial doctor to those in need. In watching these interactions, with her keen mind and strong will, Rebecca found her passion in life. “I early conceived a liking for, and sought every opportunity to relieve the sufferings of others,” she wrote in A Book of Medical Discourses.
Ethyl Smyth
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 8/1/2018
Suffragettes showed their solidarity by singing these words aloud outside Holloway Prison in London on March 1, 1912. Inside her
cell, 54-year-old Ethel Smyth stuck her head out the window and conducted the impromptu choir with a toothbrush in hand.
Fanny Jackson Coppin
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 7/1/2018
Fanny Jackson Coppin would live a life dedicated to education, but her first day of teaching was a tenuous one. “The faculty did not forbid a woman to take the gentlemen’s course, but they did not advice it,” Coppin said of her years studying at Oberlin College in Ohio in the 1860s.
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper
Kathryn S Gardiner
Published on: 6/6/2018
At the eleventh annual National Women’s Rights Convention on May 10, 1866, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper took the stage. She stood before a gathering of the suffrage movement’s dynamic leaders and gave the night’s most memorable speech.

Positions

Environment
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Policy on Environment
Election Process and Voter Rights
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Election Process and Voter Rights
Government and Fiscal Policy
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Government and Fiscal Policy
Healthcare
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Healthcare
Justice System
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Justice System
Social Policy
LWVIN
Published on: 1/1/2020
Social Policy
LWVIN Position History
LWVIN
Published on: 12/1/2019
A history of the League's positions over the years
Oral Histories
LWVIN
Published on: 11/30/2019
A collection of member oral histories from the local leagues